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Santa Paula Flight 2 July 2017

I planned to fly to Camarillo for lunch at the Way Point Café and then on to Santa Paula for open hangar day. A thick fog filled the Santa Maria Valley as I headed down to the Santa Maria Airport to search the sky for signs of blue beginning a little before eight.  As is so often the case, things didn’t work out as planned.

Santa Maria didn’t go VFR till a little before ten despite my straining to find patches of blue and the temperature/dew point spread didn’t reach four degrees till eleven.  There was a lot of blue in the sky and lots of scattered white clouds.  As I approached Lake Cachuma I could see the fog spilling over the ridge with a solid layer completely obscuring the ocean. Santa Barbara was visual meteorological conditions 1,800 foot ceilings and six miles visibility in mist but there was no visual way to get down through the clouds. There was a strong on shore breeze that pushed the fog hard up against the ridgeline with it spilling over a little in places. 


The San Marcos pass was completely blocked so I decided to climb up to 5,500 feet over the wilderness area. I love the freedom to climb over all the obstacles in my way. My world of rugged mountains expanded as I climbed higher.  With the head wind I was only making 50kts (58 miles per hour) of ground speed and it felt like we were stopped from that altitude. The terrain kept rising and I kept looking at my chart. It looked like 5,500 foot would manage the highest obstacle. With the mist blocking my distant vision it was hard to tell. Normally you can tell if you are high enough because the terrain behind the ridge gets taller as you get closer. The mist added mystery to everything.


The mist even dulled the normally jewel like Lake Casitas. Because of my late start I decided to go directly to Santa Paula and found a spot in the heavy traffic picking my ground speed up to ninety knots (104 miles per hour) to fit in with the faster planes in the narrow pattern (two RVs and a Twin Comanche. 


I had a delightful ham and eggs at the Flight 126 Café and had a nice visit with a helicopter flight instructor from Tehachapi who may get a gyroplane add on to his commercial helicopter certificate. He had been one of the RVs in the pattern. I stopped by Pat’s hanger and got all the latest on recent aviation mishaps. As usual Pat’s hangar was filled with aviation luminaries.  Several people asked me if I had seen the Red gyroplane and it tuned to be a different friend Pat in his red Calidus. 


Things didn’t work out like I had planned but they were wonderful never the less.

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San Luis Obisbo Flight 18 July 2017
A client canceled his flight today so I decided to fly to San Luis Obispo (SBP).  Things were limited because of two firefighting temporary flight restrictions (TFR) for the Alamo fire just to the North East and the Whittier fire to the South East.  As I launched, I delighted in my three dimensional playground and the freedom of the skies.

When I arrived at SBP I was pleased to see a gaggle of Mooneys; some with familiar paint jobs.  Palmdale, Los Angles, San Jose, Fresno and Santa Maria were represented by Mooney enthusiasts. Mitch invited me over to the table on the patio of The Spirit of San Luis restaurant and we had some nice hangar flying with some remarkable aviators. 

My route back to Santa Maria was limited to the coast, so I asked for a left turn out to the east with a turn to the south along California Highway One through the Avilla Pass.  It was a little warm and humid at SBP so I loved the cool ocean air washing over me as I exited the Avilla over Shell Beach. That is part of the magic of flying an open aircraft low and slow. 

Pismo Beach looked like a popular place on Saturday with a steady line of RVs headed for the dunes.

I was set up for a left down wind but tanker traffic had ATC move me to a right down wind and I was to report midfield so I flew along the bluff of the Nipomo Mesa where we live.

I was about to report when I heard; “Gyroplane two Mike Golf; make short approach; runway 30 clear to land I have a tanker on a two mile straight in.”  I take this as a high compliment because if he wasn’t sure I could get off the runway quickly he would have simply told me to extend my downwind.  I dove for the taxiway Alpha Four running her up to 100kts (115 miles per hour) making a steep turn around the tower and setting her down as nice as could be at Alpha four and scooting across the hold short line.  ATC said; “Thanks for the help Vance, Gyroplane two Mike Golf taxi to parking via Alpha, Mike; monitor ground.  Some friends were watching the tanker operations and clapped as I went by.

It was a lovely end to a magical day of flying.
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